|
Ramboll carried out detailed feasibility studies, prepared the port master plan and basis for negotiations with investors for Hambantota port
Project data
Client: Sri Lanka Port Authorities
Completion: 2007

Services we provided
Ports & marine structures
Ground engineering
Environmental impact assessment - EIA
Geophysical surveys
Masterplanning and urban development

Feasibility study for a new major seaport in Sri Lanka

Hambantota, Sri Lanka ¤

Sri Lanka Ports Authorities (SLPA) is planning to develop a new major greenfield seaport in Hambantota, situated on the south coast of Sri Lanka. Hambantota Port is expected to relieve Colombo Port and is intended to support the growing demand for servicing large vessels.

Developing one of the largest ports in the region

The new seaport is planned to have a water depth of 23 metres upon completion, meeting future demands for accommodation of mega container ships. The entire area reserved for the port is 15 square kilometres.

Situated in the main transport corridor between Europe and Asia, SLPA envisages Hambantota Port to be developed as a major container transhipment hub. The seaport is expected to contain a wide variety of terminals, including a dry bulk terminal, liquid bulk terminal, break bulk terminal, Ro-Ro terminal for vehicles and a Container transhipment terminal.

The harbour basins are located inside an existing natural lagoon and the entrance channel will be protected by the construction of two breakwaters that will be 500-1500 metres long.

Feasibility study as a basis for negotiations and financing of construction


Ramboll has carried out detailed feasibility studies, prepared the port master plan and basis for negotiations with possible investors.

Following the finalisation of the detailed feasibility study and port master planning in 2007, the first phase of the port development was initiated, comprising a service, liquid bulk and multipurpose terminal. Construction works worth approximately 450 million USD were financed by the Chinese government and carried out by Chinese contractors.

Ramboll worked with local Sri Lankan firms, including Lanka Hydraulic Institute and Resources Development Consultants. European sub-consultants were ROGGE Marine Consulting, Jacobs Consultancy and Niras.